Thursday, October 27, 2016

Psychobiotics

Here's a short article about the brain-altering chemistry of the gut. The brain-gut axis is the latest target for Big Pharma. Rather than trying to see the effects of different foods and fibers on the brain, they'd much rather develop synthetic drugs that they can sell many, many times over the cost of Raw Potato Starch or Hi-Maize.

Read the article if you like, The current state of psychobiotics, but I really just wanted to share this very well-thought-out diagram of the interactions between gut and brain:
Source



However, probiotics are only part of the story. "Prebiotics (nutrition for gut bacteria) are another channel to alter gut bacteria," Burnet says. "We call for an even further widening of the definition of 'psychobiotics' to include drugs such as antidepressants and antipsychotics, and activities such as exercise and eating, because of their effects on gut bacteria."

Just a guess, but I'll bet ya that when they do come out with prescription "psychobiotics" the ingredients will list things like raw potato starch, Hi-Maize, Inulin, and all the other fibers we've been discussing around these parts for years.

This just out on PubMed: Resistant Starch Bagels Reduce Fasting and Postprandial Insulin in Adults at Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

These data suggest that consumption of a high-HAM-RS2 bagel improves glycemic efficiency by reducing the amount of insulin required to manage postprandial glucose while improving fasting insulin sensitivity in adults at increased risk of T2D. This research provides support for a feasible dietary strategy for T2D risk reduction. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02129946.

HAMS, of course, is Hi-Maize corn starch. Someday, someone will get rich off of RS, creating supplements, drugs, and snack-foods. Until then, we'll just keep chugging along, eating our dried plantains, popcorn, and oatmeal.

Later!
Tim




55 comments:

  1. hey Tim this may have been answered before, but do you cook and cool oatmeal the same way you do potatoes, beans, pasta?

    Geoff Donoho

    ReplyDelete
  2. I usually just cook it and eat it hot. Allowing it to cool would definitely create more RS and make it a bit healthier. The standard meals in many parts of Africa have consisted of "stale maize porridge" for several centuries, since the introduction of corn to Africa in the 17-1800's. This cooked and cooled polenta is credited with giving them incredible resistance to colorectal cancer. I have no reason to think oatmeal would not provide similar benefits if eaten as a cold leftover.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In Finland we traditionally used to refry yesterday's oatmeal porridge, I haven't thought of it from a RS perspective before but now I realise I have to try it. Said to be really tasty as well!

      Delete
  3. too bad med express left out this: https://www.cornucopia.org/2014/03/gut-wrenching-new-studies-reveal-insidious-effects-glyphosate/ ...Describing the effects of glyphosate, the Entropy article states: “Negative impact on the body is insidious and manifests slowly over time.”[ii] The authors cite several ways glyphosate may contribute to the chronic diseases that have occurred with increasing frequency as use of the herbicide has increased.

    Roundup® kills plants by interfering with a biochemical pathway involved with synthesis of amino acids, called the shikimate pathway. This pathway is not found in humans, therefore it was assumed that glyphosate does not harm humans. The pathway is found in bacteria, however, and humans depend on bacteria in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to synthesize the essential amino acids.

    By interfering with the biochemistry of bacteria in our GI tract, consumption of glyphosate depletes essential amino acids and predisposes humans to a host of chronic health problems. Specifically, glyphosate depletes the amino acids tyrosine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine, which can then contribute to obesity, depression, autism, inflammatory bowel disease, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 'The Pesticide Action Network (PAN) in a 96-page document entitled Glyphosate, reveals how people all around the world are being systemically poisoned by glyphosate, and many of them are even dying.'
      -- Ethan A. Huff
      http://pan-international.org/wp-content/uploads/Glyphosate-monograph.pdf
      [96 pgs]

      Delete
    2. I'm seeing support for Glyphosate fade as reports like these come out, and even some federal agencies banning the use of glyphosate/GMO on federal land. And France purportedly banned glyphosate use recently.

      I suspect that one day glyphosate will be banned everywhere, but replaced by what? Better GMOs? You can bet there is an arms race going to produce plants that can survive in Post-Roundup World.

      Delete
  4. Dear Tim: How are you? The diagram is very aesthetic. Pretty. I've recently been thinking about the blood brain barrier because often people get brain fog with certain food sensitivities no matter how much they try to address any leaky gut issues. Have you come across how "psychobiotics" could affect the microglial cells in the brain, which I've started wondering about having a role in these food sensitivity brain reactions? Any specifics on how they'd interact with the BBB?---Terri

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I read lots about the brain-gut axis over the last couple years. Microbes and metabolites have ways across the blood-brain barrier that is only now being realized.

      It was big news in 2014 when they discovered a fungal protein that could cross the BBB and cause meningitis. http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/publish/news/newsroom/9030

      Read this description about the BBB and see if it does not send chills up your spine, lol. Sound similar to any other barrier?

      "Brain endothelial cells are distinguished from the other cells of the BBB by possessing fewer cytoplasmic vesicles, more mitochondria and a large number of intercellular junctions that promote high transendothelial electrical resistance and retard paracellular flux."

      Leaky gut...leaky brain.

      Delete
    2. That quote was from Defense at the border: the blood–brain barrier versus bacterial foreigners, 2013.

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3589978/

      Delete
  5. Thanks. Trying to read through the articles now. I wonder what triggers the tight junctions of the brain. I wonder if gluten does the same thing to them as the GI ones. And other zonulin openers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. After writing my reply about "leaky brain" I started googling it, and found that people have been talking about this effect for several years. A few "gurus" were talking about "leaky brain" back in 2010-2012, but no one seemed to follow up on it. Here's Kresser describing the condition in 2012:

      https://chriskresser.com/could-a-leaky-gut-be-making-you-fat/

      If you search PubMed for "leaky brain" there is very little, but then again, the term "leaky gut" did not start showing up on PubMed searches until 2012 and later.

      This seems to be a topic that got lost amidst the gut biome, SIBO, and resistant starch talk of the past 5 years.

      Delete
    2. From that Kresser link:

      "Obesity caused by a leaky brain?

      One more potential issue (not discussed by this particular review paper) is the possibility that systemic inflammation can actually cause leakiness in the blood-brain barrier as well. (3) C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory protein that is elevated in obesity, has been found to increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier, possibly leading to inflammation in the hypothalamus. This neuroinflammation can cause impairment of central nervous system (CNS) function, which has been associated with poor control of food intake, leptin resistance, and obesity.

      Furthermore, LPS toxins, released into the blood by a leaky gut, can rapidly increase blood leptin concentrations; this increase is enhanced by the presence of CRP, which could explain why chronic inflammation is associated with a rise in both CRP and leptin in humans. In this way, a leaky gut and a leaky brain, both caused by systemic inflammation and exacerbated by gut dysbiosis, can increase the risk of developing obesity due to the disruption in CNS and leptin function."

      Delete
  6. Yes. Leaky brain turns up little. Microglial activation turns up quite a lot and is so interesting. It is forcing me to go back and really learn about the "barrier." How would LPS "get across?" Would little polypeptide fragments really be able to "get across" (ie, gluten, casein, etc.)? Or would it be more of a cytokine reaction once the body itself responds to these little polypeptides peripherally with increased cytokine production, which could then cross the BBB?

    Based on what you copied above from Kresser, interesting to think about bulimia and compulsive overeating and obesity in the sense of leaky brain.

    I wonder what Emily Deans and Georgia Ede know/think about this as psychiatrists who advocate eating changes. I've found some articles on bipolar and other psych disorders as I Google microglial activation and follow citations around.

    I guess I wonder: What is leaky brain? Is it real? Is it similar to leaky gut? Will healing leaky gut help reverse leaky brain? Or could leaky brain possible contribute to leaky gut? Or maybe it's a reciprocal relationship? Is there something genetic that could account (say something like secretor status or probably something unknown to me at all!)? How does one reverse leaky brain? If leaky brain exists, why was it crammed down my throat in pharmacy and med school that the BBB is so special and impermeable? And more questions. Every day it seems someone new is telling me they're on an SSRI. I don't know. Just seems like a lot. And then I read SSRIs may work not by the neurotransmitters but by suppressing cytokines in the brain.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What about 'chemo-brain'? What about the brain-fog of fibromylagia or Lyme or even menopause? Are any or all of these related in any way? I'm wondering if (in some cases at least) brain fog has anything to do with the newly-discovered lymphatic vessels in the brain. Improper lymph drainage? I've seen articles saying that exercise has a positive influence on the microbiome, and we know it has a positive influence on lymph movement, too. Connections? Maybe?

      Then there's that sneaky "primo-vascular system" of which we know zip. I don't think we can discount that in any discussion of how an out-of-whack microbiome might affect the rest of the body, even the brain, although that's just a hunch. Have you seen this Terri? It's pretty cool.
      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3722848/

      Delete
    2. Still LOTS we do not know, eh? But one thing is certain, the foods we eat are key to our health. Also stress, sleep, etc... but food is the one thing we should try hard to get right. And for everyone it will be different, in some respects.

      Delete
    3. "Wild Cucumber": Hello! I've been reading on brain fog for a friend who had traumatic brain injury, and so yes, I started with CFS/Lyme/chemo brain research! The causes may be different but the responses maybe not so much.

      So true that it's all inter-related. I linked to an article below which starts to pull many of the threads together. Even at the end of the article there is a box that talks about the gut microbiome and manipulation of it. It is all connected. I just wish the general population would see that it is and endeavor to eat real food, take daily walks outside, sleep well, etc. Just so frustrated my profession belittles the whole life experience as a part of health. Whah. Whah. Whah.

      I will go read the article you link to now. Thank you.

      Delete
    4. I'm so excited to be back after just getting started here and having to stop and focus on something else for a few months. I know nothing of "leaky brain", but I have experienced years of crushing brain fog. Did the blood allergy test (10 years ago) avoided all the foods for 6 months - nothing. Was diagnosed with MS. My worst symptoms: slurred stuttered speech, bells palsy, left side weakness, 24/7 paresthesia, body temp would not regulate, brain fog, massive headache, unthinkable fibro pain, unbelievable fatigue, etc.

      Ended up at a doc who believed that MS was un-dx low thyroid and adrenal fatigue. I was treated with Armour Thryoid and low dose cortisol (Addison's type of dose - no immune suppressing dose). My recovery was remarkable! W/in 6-8 weeks I felt healthier than in my entire life, even seeing color more vividly. But my gain was inconsistent throughout the day and after a year I started going backwards. Later dx with Lyme - co-infections.

      IDK - if this information helps any of you connect any dots with what you are studying, but I thought I'd share.

      Delete
    5. Another thought I had about the BBB was Dr. Deitrich Klinghardt's work on Lyme. He believes most of the world now carries Lyme (due to the many ways it spreads - acknowledged in EU not US). Because babies are infected inutero - his hypothesis is that their immune systems are already compromised, then they are vaccinated which in turn causes mini-strokes in the brain causing austism and other problems.

      I have used a doctor who studied under him for six years. Part of her treatment (as well as other natural docs) is to heal the gut and chelate heavy metals. She has great success. So, the damage is in the brain, but treating the gut is the "cure".

      Delete
  7. Yes. Totally!!!! No one right way. I agree! And very multi-factorial!

    Here's a nice, graphic drawing like yours above highlighting the blood brain barrier side of it. If we could merge them together, we'd have a more complete drawing. Then, if someone could plug in some more details, especially where psychobiotics could intersect, that would be so pretty.

    I'm not sure how my pasting of the address will link to the figure. But I'll try. Hope it pulls it up. It's Figure 2 in "The impact of microglial activation on blood-brain barrier in brain diseases" in a 2014 Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience.

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4217497/figure/F2/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, very good diagram! Notice how T Cells play a central role in brain and gut. They are born in Peyer's Patches (highly RS sensitive!) and seem to cross tight junctions with ease.

      Delete
  8. Aren't they made in the bone marrow and move on to the Peyer's Patches? Things change, so my old knowledge may be moot.

    BUT...you HAVE to read this! It's so exciting to me!

    http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/47289/title/Immune-System-Maintains-Brain-Health/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Very exciting, and brand new (1 Nov 2016)! Reading, I realized I should have been talking about Tregs, not T cells. Tregs (regulatory T cells) are the ones that get trained in the gut and move freely in and out of the Peyer's patches.

      I'm far from an expert on the immune system, you could literally spend your entire life studying this stuff. Good paper on Nutritional Immunology: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4754447/

      Delete
    2. How bizarre. Mark Sisson was talking about this exact same thing yesterday: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/why-the-blood-brain-barrier-is-so-critical-and-how-to-maintain-it/

      Delete
    3. Thanks for those! Skimmed the Sisson one and will get to the nutritional immunology one. A lot of people have brain fog, headaches, and mood changes with particular foods, despite working on their guts and lifestyle. There has to be something extra here. Something we need to see. (???)

      Delete
  9. This doesn't really have anything to do with the BBB but it does discuss how low Vit. D levels effect gut bacteria and how that leads to neurological issues.

    http://drgominak.com/vitamin-d-hormone.html

    ReplyDelete
  10. Tim, You should really also investigate what low dose naltrexone can do, and more specifically how normalizing the endorphin system trough ldn has such dramatic effects in all ways. Ldn is an ideal complement to all this, the only real psychobiotic if you ask me. I recently found a splendid dutch(flemish even) site that tells all what the endorphin/opioid system is responsible for (and the dpp iv enzyme guarding it, along with tens and tens of other functions). It's mind blowing.
    If you want i could do some research for good english explanations/sites (but motivation has gotten a huge dent now, see below)

    If i needed anymore confirmation of in what an upside down world we live.. I just got a subpena from the food and drug agency (here in belgium very justfully named fagg), for importing the harmless ldn. Never did i have one in previous ordering of drugs (one occasion i had that a package from iherb was seized and a lady questioned me at my house. I ordered many many supplements, and then for this garcinia combogia it was a problem all of the sudden)

    I guess bye bye life and the little money I had (and would be able to make comfortably by getting well trough ldn).

    God, just look at the fucking sky around here, chemtrails all over the place to the point I don't even get to expect receiving some good sun rays (took pictures this morning, but don't see an option of posting pic here)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mister Meat - That's crazy that your government does not allow LDN. Maybe you can find a doctor to prescribe it, or something similar? You seem very distraught, hope you get help!

      Delete
    2. This is what Chris Kresser says of LDN, but, I must admit, it fits in with our talk on psychobiotics perfectly.

      "So if you’re interested in LDN, keep in mind it has to be prescribed by a physician, or in some states, a naturopath can prescribe it. You can print out some studies from PubMed. You can go into PubMed.org and search for “low-dose naltrexone,” and there are a bunch of studies that will pop out. You can print those out and take them to your doctor to discuss. There’s a website called LDNinfo.org that has kind of a clearinghouse of information on LDN that you can go to. There’s a Yahoo group about LDN that you can join and talk to folks there and try to find a practitioner in your area.

      What I don’t recommend is ordering it from overseas pharmacies. You never know what you’re getting that way, and there have been a lot of studies showing that drugs that come from those pharmacies are not often what they claim to be, and that’s just flat out dangerous and not very smart. Hopefully that goes without saying, but I’m just mentioning it anyway."

      https://chriskresser.com/low-dose-naltrexone-ldn-as-a-treatment-for-autoimmune-disease/

      Delete
  11. Jerry - no doctor will prescribe, the very best they say "its not indicated for that, even if i wanted to prescribe it". "Get help" i cringe when I hear that, real help is very rare these days. Thanks for the supporting voice

    Tim - chris kresser was the first who i heard/read talking about it. 3 years ago briefly. And then 2 years ago i grasped the bigness of this (trough ldn talk alone). Last year, in my psychosis, begging for it (they gave me zyprexa instead of naltrexon, unknowingly. Great help eh). Since last month discovering the hugeness of endorphin/opioid system.
    I'll compile some sites/text on what i feel i want conveyed to you (it won't be 'synthesised' lol, gotta watch the ocd and i cant log in to my laptop i'm using ipad)

    Yes i learn't ordering drugs is risky anyhow. But i had this one ordered from dr. Bihari his website, the 'founder' of ldn in the 80's. A guy named Ian hewitt (who takes it for his hep b) send it to me from india (where they produce it). So i figured i couldn't go wrong..

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Re: "no doctor will prescribe" - my dad's doctor SUGGESTED it for him (chronic low back pain) and introduced it to the family...apparently he takes it himself (this is DC/MD area)

      Delete
  12. It might be helpful to point out that the BBB, gut and kidney integrity is all based on heparan sulfate. Many of these structures can be repaired therapeutically with injected heparin. Heparin is the most commonly used drug in hospitals and is used to block blood clotting. Heparin is naturally produced in large amounts by mast cells in the gut and is commercially obtained from scrapings of hog and cattle intestines. Heparin is also released along with histamine from mast cells activated in allergies. Heparin has many of the properties of the surface of cells and blocks the adherence of viruses and bacteria. In a reciprocal way, peptides with heparin-binding sites are antimicrobial, e.g. the defensins in the crypts of gut microvilli under the control of vitamin D. That is why stomach proteases specifically chop proteins into fragments containing natural heparin-binding domains.

    My own research tentatively showed that inflammation induced in cultured cartilage cells shut down heparan sulfate production, suggesting that chronic inflammation reduces heparan sulfate and contributes to leaky BBB, gut and kidney.

    Heparin injections and aspirin are used to lower chronic inflammation to reverse infertility that requires suppression of inflammation to permit implantation and gestation.

    Protein losing enteropathy is a condition of leaky gut that can be treated with heparin.

    Heparin also reverses Crohn's disease.

    Protein loss from the kidneys is a symptom of pre-eclampsia during pregnancy and has been avoided in some trials simply by eating sardines high in omega-3 fish oils. The fish oils also lower inflammation, which probably contributes to higher heparan sulfate levels.

    MS is also associated with leaky BBB and may respond to lowered inflammation and heparin.

    In most cases, the impact of heparin treatments has little to do with blood clotting and more to do with leakiness of barrier structures or receptor-hormone interactions mediated by binding heparin.

    Heparin is also the scaffold used for the construction of amyloid fibers, as in Alzheimer's, atherosclerosis and diabetes.

    Many of the protein hormones in the brain also bind to receptors via heparan sulfate on cell membranes.

    I am just pointing out another linkage between inflammation and the integrity of the BBB, gut and kidney.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Update (off-topic, sorry. Not sure which is the most currently active thread)

    Did one week of the potato hack. For every 3 pounds of potatoes, I put 2 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon black pepper, and a teaspoon of ground up garlic. Mashed the potatoes in the Kitchen-Aid.

    For months I haven't been able to lose a pound. In that week, I lost 6 pounds. Then I went off the potato hack. The next day I dropped another half pound. Now I'm going back on the potato hack, after a week of eating whatever I want. I only gained back 2 pounds.

    One side effect: there is a transition period where my body adapts to the potatoes. Not so much farting, but there is like a caffeine buzz in my head that throws my sleep cycle out of whack. Took till the end of the week to get things back in line. Now on this second run, it is happening all over again.

    Now that the high holy days are over for the year, I plan to potato hack in a way similar to Scott Abel's cycle diet; 6 days on, 1 day off. When I looked at the chart, it seems everyone gets their greatest fat loss during the first week. Maybe the weekly feast day will detune the body and keep the effect going stronger like it does in the cycle diet.

    ReplyDelete
  14. About the potatoes. In the past I boiled them, pressure cooked them, etc. They would always turn into a gelatinous mass, like tapioca. This time I did something different. Now I have super creamy whipped potatoes, with zero fat added.

    The trick is to use the Instant Pot and do these things:

    1. Put 2 cups of water in the Instant Pot, and stack the potatoes on the trivet. This means they are steam cooked, not water cooked. This means the potatoes don't absorb more water while cooking.

    2. Use the "rice" cook setting. This cooks the potatoes for 10 minutes. The potatoes are cooked thoroughly, even big potatoes, but there is still just a hint of hardness in the core of the potatoes, just like the old Irish method of cooking potatoes.

    3. After they cool to room temperature, refrigerate the potatoes overnight (or longer)

    4. Peel the potatoes, get rid of any eyes or dark spots. You can use your fingernails.

    5. Crush the potatoes with your hands, then put them in the Kitchen Aid mixer, and mix on low. Add water slowly until you get just the right consistency.

    6. Eat them cold, eat them hot, whatever you like.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I need to get an Instant Pot, been hearing lots of good things...just need to clean a spot on the countertop, lol. Good mashed potatoes are a joy to eat, for sure. Have you tried making a very simple gravy of potato starch and chicken broth?

      Delete
    2. Tim -

      I do not have an instant pot. But my understanding is that it functions as a pressure cooker. I do have those. I will give you no-stir whole-grain risotto (barley, farro, and more) recipes that are amazing. It does require the quick pressure release method, which I'm not sure the instant pot does since I do not have one. Quick release breaks the starches and makes the risotto creamy.

      Delete
    3. Hi Wilbur. The benefit of the instant pot, is that you push a button and walk away. I have a lot going on in my life, and I had a couple close calls with pressure cookers. One of them was so close that I got an eviction notice. The Instant Pot is extremely safe; I press the button and my food is cooked, no matter what emergency comes up and makes me forget. Until I used the Instant Pot to cook rice, I didn't know what Asians were talking about when they speak of the "fragrance" of rice. But now I know. Rice is very fragrant! The Instant Pot made the best rice I've ever had.

      Delete
    4. Just ordered my InstaPot yesterday (the 7 in 1) with a 10% off coupon. My daughter loves hers.

      Delete
  15. The cycle diet will only work once you've reached a certain level of depletion as a result of being in a realative deficit for a certain period of time. It could take months of dieting before the spike day can be implemented. Otherwise, it won't work.

    ReplyDelete
  16. This is the potato hack, not the cycle diet. Combining the two is an N=1 for me. If it works, I'll let you know.

    ReplyDelete
  17. With regular cycle diet, your metabolism needs to be healed to a point where a metabolic spike every seven days will be effective. Having a feast day every week on the potato hack has a similar, but different role; detuning the body, so it doesn't get TOO adapted to the potato diet. In all the charts I saw, greatest fat loss was in the first week, then it continues at a slower rate. This same adaptation happens when fasting. In the cycle diet, the feast day also stops the body from downregulating the metabolism due to "locking in" at the current calorie rate.

    When losing a pound a day, I see no reason not to do an off day.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think it really helps to completely change things up periodically for those prone to easy weight gain. Most diets have cheat days or other cycles for a reason...they work!

      Delete
    2. Last night I tried what you said, having 4oz of meat several hours separated from any potato eating. Woke up, lost a pound. Last week I did the same with chicken; it worked. However, I put 20 calories worth of chicken into my mash potatoes the next day, and it halted weight loss for the next 3 days. So, you were right on; no mixing of meat and potatoes while losing weight.

      Delete
    3. Haha, that's not the first time I've heard this! Gotta trust the spuds. People always ask me, 'Will it work if I....?' I got tired of answering, 'No,' so now I just say, 'Try.' Usually it does not work if the plan involves mixing anything with potatoes, even stuff like broccoli and spinach. It seems it would not detract from the hack, but it does. Magic, I guess.

      Delete
    4. I have some loaves of Icelandic volcano bread (rye) I made before the potato hack started, so I've been nibbling on that occasionally. Same deal; as long as I don't mix it with the spuds, weight loss continues. The texture is like meatloaf.

      Delete
    5. However, adding a teaspoon of garlic paste to 3 pounds of spuds doesn't stop the weight loss. And it does help the flavor.

      Delete
  18. Another off topic question. Not sure where to place it. I began using some digestive enzymes because I believe I wasn't properly digesting fats. I see that alpha-Amalase, Amyloglucosidase, Cellulase and Hemicellulase are listed in the contents. Does that mean that starches and fiber in the food I eat will be broken down and absorbed by me before they get to the colon where they would normally feed healthy bacteria?
    Anne

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you are correct in your assumption. Cellulase should break down cellulose, whether that's a "good thing" or not is debatable.

      Beano contains alph galactosidase to break down certain bean fibers that cause gas, but in our effort to become a polite, non-farting human, we starve our gut flora of what they like.

      Delete
  19. Tim,
    have you had a chance to review the new study mentioned (and accessible) in the following article? It shows that taking probiotics can reduce overall inflammation and even reverse Azheimer's. Pretty amazing results in just a short 12 weeks! One has to wonder if they would have been even better with an increased fiber intake. Here you go:

    http://www.drperlmutter.com/reversing-alzheimers-with-probiotics/

    Frank

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've read a lot that suggests the gut might be a contributor to various cognition issues. You might be interested in Terry Wahl's book (and her research) about a diet that seems to benefit people with MS. She argues (and I believe too) that a great number of illnesses are manifestations of the same disease - autoimmunity and inflammation. This might include Alzheimer's. Her "basic" diet is similar to mine, although I eat more fiber. She has a lot of discussion of how diet impacts brain health, including the role and importance of saturated fats. Her story is inspiring: She has MS, but this diet allowed her to go from wheelchair to a bicycle. Hope this helps.

      Delete
  20. Tim, and Wilbur,
    For a couple of months now I have been research Sweet lupin beans and Lupin flour as a plant protein source. Apparently it is also very high in fiber.

    Nutrition Facts 1/4 cup (30 g): Calories 74, Total Fat 2 g, Saturated Fat 0 g, Trans Fat 0 g, Cholesterol 0 mg, Sodium 9 mg, Carbohydrate 12 g, Fiber 11 g, Sugar 1 g, Protein 12 g

    There is a lady who is promoting it in Holland, and after doing some google searching have found that it is very popular in Australia. On Amazon Germany I have found several books in german on sweet lupins. Quite a few German blogs are mentioning one of the books and you can also buy sweet lupin flour, flakes, and beans. So it is getting to be big business in Germany as well.

    I have been adding a teaspoon full of the lupin flour to the potato starch, maize meel (corn), my green banana resistant starch (from Australia), tapioca flour, inulin powder and boab as my morning prebiotic drink.

    As lupin flour is all fiber, I would think it would be a good RS source. Am I right?

    Jo tB

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've read up on lupin and it does seem to be a very healthful food. I have not seen an analysis if RS content, so cannot speak to that.

      Here's some good holiday reading for you: "Health benefits of legumes and pulses with a focus on Australian sweet lupins"

      https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26965756

      Click around and you can get the full text for free, or try this link:

      http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/25/1/1.pdf

      Teaser: "Like the rest of the legume family, lupin acts as a preb i- otic in the human gut. Smith et al demonstrated that l u- pin kernel fibre modified fecal microbiota in humans, increasing the levels of Bifidobacterium spp. and lowe r- ing C. ramosum and C. spiroforme levels over a 28 day trial by with the inclusion of an extra 17 - 30 g of lupin fibre per day. 12 8 Another trial by Fechner et al observed that supplementation of 25 g of lupin fibre a day led to a significant increase in the formation of short - chain fatty acids and that L. angustifolius also reduced fecal conce n- trations of total and secondary bile acids by 16%, i n- creased primary bile - excretion and decreased fecal pH which are all beneficial in reducing risk factors for col o- rectal cancer. 12 9 These studies demonstrate that legumes, and more specifically lupi n, may play an important role in the modification of the microbiome which may lead to improvements in health outcomes."

      Delete
    2. I used to buy jars of brined 'lupini beans' at a Portuguese bakery. Absolutely delicious & addictive.

      This article says those who are allergic to peanuts might react to lupins.

      http://fiberisthefuture.com/2012/12/the-lovely-and-potentially-lethal-lupini-bean/

      Delete
  21. Hello everyone, I just want to share with you my new discover. RS failed to deliver benefits for me, sorry. I'm on wheat bran. Yes, WHEAT. And I'm doing great for the first time in 12 (?)years. http://stoolschool.org/background-information/about-wheat-bran I hope it helps someone.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wheat bran? Micronutrients. You have been malnourished for 12 years.

      https://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5742/2

      Delete
  22. sorry, discoverY

    ReplyDelete